Appendix

Appendix: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
MacOwan
  Macowani,   Macowania,   Macowaniana,   Macowanianum,   Macowanii
Dr. Peter MacOwan (1830-1909), professor of chemistry at Huddersfield College, moved to South Africa for his health, and became Principal of Shaw College. After taking up botany, he began collecting and corresponding with people like Asa Gray at Harvard and Sir William Hooker at Kew. He was one of the first professors of botany in Cape Town, Director of the Cape Town Botanic Gardens, later Professor of Botany at the South African College, and Government Botanist in charge of the Herbarium until 1905. He collected a specimen of Leucadendron macowanii in the Wynberg area in the southwestern Cape around 1883. He was an enormously productive plant collector and is also commemorated with names in the current genera Struthiola, Senecio, Muraltia, Buxus, Albuca, Erica, Apodolirion, Crinum, Cyrtanthus, Alepidea, Eulophia, Disperis, Solanum, Isoglossa, Ruschia, Merx-muellera, Heliophila, Crassula and Walafrida, and probably others plus many that have since been synonymized. The genus Macowania in the Asteraceae was published by British botanist Daniel Oliver in 1870. (Gunn & Codd; Wikipedia)
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Magnus
  Alberta,   magna
Albertus Magnus (c.1200-1280), sometimes called Albert Graf von Bollstädt, also called Teutonicus, Coloniensis Albert, Albert the Great, St. Albert, the German Albert, and Albert of Lauingen. He was born Albert de Groot, and later the surname Magnus ("the Great"), which was the Latin equivalent of his family name, was applied to him by Roger Bacon and other contemporaries. He was a famous German cleric, philosopher and theologian who wrote De vegetabilus, a botanical work in seven volumes. He studied Aristotelian philosophy and was a scholar of enormous learning who was interested in all branches of natural science. He believed in the transmutation of base metals into gold but was unsuccessful in his attempts to accomplish that. He was the first to produce arsenic in a free form, recognized that the Milky Way was composed of stars, experimented with photosensitive chemicals like silver nitrate, and studied the combinations of metals. He was a prolific author and wrote many treatises on subjects such as logic, theology, botany, music, geography, astronomy, astrology, mineralogy, chemistry, zoology, physiology and phrenology. St. Thomas Aquinas was one of his favorite pupils. From 1260 to 1262 he was Bishop of Regensburg. He joined the Dominican Order in 1223 and taught at Hildesheim, Freiburg, Regensburg, Strasbourg, and Cologne before the University of Paris made him Doctor of Theology in 1245. He was beatified in 1622 and canonized in 1932. The genus Alberta in the Rubiaceae was published in 1838 by German botanist Ernst Heinrich Friedrich Meyer. (PlantzAfrica; Columbia Encyclopedia; Wikipedia)
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Magnus
  Alberta,    magna
Albertus Magnus (c.1200-1280), sometimes called Albert Graf von Bollstädt, also called Teutonicus, Coloniensis Albert, Albert the Great, St. Albert, the German Albert, and Albert of Lauingen. He was born Albert de Groot, and later the surname Magnus ("the Great"), which was the Latin equivalent of his family name, was applied to him by Roger Bacon and other contemporaries. He was a famous German cleric, philosopher and theologian who wrote De vegetabilus, a botanical work in seven volumes. He studied Aristotelian philosophy and was a scholar of enormous learning who was interested in all branches of natural science. He believed in the transmutation of base metals into gold but was unsuccessful in his attempts to accomplish that. He was the first to produce arsenic in a free form, recognized that the Milky Way was composed of stars, experimented with photosensitive chemicals like silver nitrate, and studied the combinations of metals. He was a prolific author and wrote many treatises on subjects such as logic, theology, botany, music, geography, astronomy, astrology, mineralogy, chemistry, zoology, physiology and phrenology. St. Thomas Aquinas was one of his favorite pupils. From 1260 to 1262 he was Bishop of Regensburg. He joined the Dominican Order in 1223 and taught at Hildesheim, Freiburg, Regensburg, Strasbourg, and Cologne before the University of Paris made him Doctor of Theology in 1245. He was beatified in 1622 and canonized in 1932. The genus Alberta in the Rubiaceae was published in 1838 by German botanist Ernst Heinrich Friedrich Meyer. (PlantzAfrica; Columbia Encyclopedia; Wikipedia)
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Maire
  Mairei,   Mairia
Herr Louis Maire (fl. 1815-1833), a Prussian plant collector and companion of Johannes Ludwig Leopold Mund who was sent by the Prussian government and the Berlin Museum to the Cape about 1816. They apparently did a lot of collecting at first and then their efforts diminished to the point where they were accused of living in 'sloth and gaiety.' They were recalled but refused to comply. Mund became a surveyor and Maire set up as a doctor. Maire also may have begun using the name Lemaire. Phylica mairei was collected in 1820 by Maire and Mund near Bredasdorp. The genus Mairia in the Asteraceae was published in 1832 by German botanist and physician Christian Gottfried Daniel Nees von Esenbeck. (Hugh Clarke, pers. comm.; Gunn & Codd; JSTOR)
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Manning
  manningiana,   manningii
Dr. John Manning, a highly respected research botanist at the Compton Herbarium, South African National Biodiversity Institute (SANBI), Cape Town, world authority on the Iris and Hyacinth families, accomplished and knowledgeable plant collector and photographer, and prolific author of popular and scientific papers and wildflower field guides including Photographic Guide to the Wildflowers of South Africa, Field Guide to Fynbos, South African Wildflowers: Jewels of the Veld, and co-author with Peter Goldblatt of Cape Plants: A Conspectus of the Cape Flora of South Africa,The Color Encyclopedia of Cape Bulbs, South African Wildflower Guide No. 9: Nieuwoudtville, and Gladiolus in Southern Africa. Dr. Manning is commemorated with Villarsia manningiana and Scaraboides manningii. ("A New Species of Villarsia from South Africa" by Robert Ornduff)
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Hermann Wilhelm Rudolf Marloth (1855-1931), German-born South African botanist, pharmacist, chemist, botanical explorer and plant collector, author of the superb Flora of Africa in six volumes (1913-1932) and its supplement the Dictionary of the Common Names of Plants, professor of chemistry at Victoria College (later Stellenbosch University), Chairman of the Mountain Club of South Africa 1901-1906, made many collecting trips with the German botanist and phytogeographer Andreas Schimper. The genus Marlothia in the Rhamnaceae was published in 1888 by Heinrich Gustav Adolf Engler, Marlothiella in the Apiaceae in 1912 by Karl Friedrich August Hermann Wolff, and Marlothistella in the Aizoaceae in 1928 by Martin Heinrich Gustav Schwantes. Marloth is commemorated by dozens of species, too many to list. (CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names, Wikipedia; Gunn & Codd)
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Martius
  martiana
Carl (Karl) Friedrich Philipp Martius (1794-1868), German botanist, naturalist, ethnographer, medical doctor and surgeon, professor of the University of Munich and director of the Munich botanical gardens, author of Historia naturalis palmarum and Nova genera et species plantarum Brasiliensium, explored the Amazon and brought back to Europe hundreds of preserved mammals, birds, amphibians, fish, insects, plants and seeds, and extensively studied the culture of Brazilian indians, wrote about potato diseases and aborigines, initiator of the Flora Braziliensis which described almost 23,000 species and which is still today the only complete flora of that country. He is commemorated with Struthiola martiana, Agathosma martiana and Lophocolea martiana, and also with the genus Martiella which does not appear in southern Africa. (Wikipedia; Chrono-Biographical Sketches; David Hollombe, pers. comm.)
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Martley
  Martleyi
J.F. Martley, a bulb-grower who, inter alia, found a new Gladiolus at Banhoek, Stellenbosch in 1932 which he brought to the attention of Kirstenbosch botanists and which was published as Gladiolus martleyi. He was also commemorated with Lampranthus martleyi. (Hugh Clarke, pers. comm.)
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Masson
  Massonia,   Massoniana,   Massoniella,   Massonii
Francis Masson (1741-1805), a Scotsman from Aberdeen, gardener, first plant collector for Kew Gardens for which he added more than 400 new species, author of Stapeliae Novae, he was sent to the Cape by Joseph Banks with Captain Cook on his second circumnavigation of the globe. His two trips to South Africa resulted in his being there from 1772 to 1775 and then from 1786 to 1795. He also visited Madeira, the Canary Islands and Azores, West Indies, North America and North Africa, explored with Thunberg, sent specimens to Joseph Banks, Fellow of the Linnean Society, author of Stapeliae Novae (1796), died by freezing in North America. One source reported that he discovered more than 1700 species, including such familiar plants both to visitors to South Africa and to horticulturists everywhere as the arum and belladonna lilies, the bird of paradise, the king protea and the red hot poker. The genus Massonia in the Hyacinthaceae was published by 1780 by Swedish naturalist Carl Peter Thunberg. He is also commemorated by Metalasia massonii, Albuca massonii, Erica massonii, Thamnea massoniella, and the former taxa Crassula massonii (now C. alpestris), and probably for Wahlenbergia massonii and Lachenalia massonii. (CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names; Wikipedia; Gunn & Codd)
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Masters
  Mastersiella
Maxwell Tylden Masters (1833-1907), British botanist and physician, Fellow of the Linnean and Royal Societies, restio specialist at Kew Botanical Gardens for the latter half of the 19th century, and the son of the nurseryman William Masters (1796-1874). His major work was Vegetable Teratology [abnormal mutations], an account of the principal deviations from the usual construction of plants (1869), and he wrote several other books such as Botany for Beginners (1872), On the Conifers of Japan (1881), and Plant Life on the Farm (1885). He was editor of the Gardeners' Chronicle between 1866–1907 and corresponded with Charles Darwin. He also contributed monographs to the Flora of Tropical Africa by Daniel Oliver, the Flora of British India, and Flora Brasiliensis by Carl Friedrich Philipp von Martius et. al. The genus Mastersiella in the Restionaceae was published in 1930 by German botanist Charlotte Gilg-Benedict. (Hugh Clarke, pers. comm.; CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names; Journal of Botany, British and Foreign)
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Mearns
  mearsii
Edward Alexander Mearns (1856-1916), U.S. army surgeon, ornithologist, field naturalist and plant collector, mainly in Kenya and elsewhere, commemorated with Acacia mearnsii. He was assigned as a Medical Officer with the United States-Mexican International Boundary Survey. From 1892 to 1894, he explored the boundary line from El Paso, Texas, to San Clemente Island, and collected 30,000 specimens of flora and fauna which were deposited in the United States National Museum. From 1903 to 1907 he served two tours of duty in the Philippines. In 1909 he was invited by Theodore Roosevelt to accompany the Smithsonian Roosevelt African Expedition as a naturalist. From 1909 to 1910, Mearns explored parts of British East Africa from Mount Kenya to the White Nile. Mearns' last expedition was in 1911, when he served as a naturalist with the Childs Frick Expedition to Africa. He collected the type of Acacia mearnsii from a cultivated specimen in East Africa. (Hugh Clarke, pers. comm.; Wikipedia; Smithsonian Institution Archives)
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Mearns
  mearnsii
Edward Alexander Mearns (1856-1916), U.S. army surgeon, ornithologist, field naturalist and plant collector, mainly in Kenya and elsewhere, commemorated with Acacia mearnsii. He was assigned as a Medical Officer with the United States-Mexican International Boundary Survey. From 1892 to 1894, he explored the boundary line from El Paso, Texas, to San Clemente Island, and collected 30,000 specimens of flora and fauna which were deposited in the United States National Museum. From 1903 to 1907 he served two tours of duty in the Philippines. In 1909 he was invited by Theodore Roosevelt to accompany the Smithsonian Roosevelt African Expedition as a naturalist. From 1909 to 1910, Mearns explored parts of British East Africa from Mount Kenya to the White Nile. Mearns' last expedition was in 1911, when he served as a naturalist with the Childs Frick Expedition to Africa. He collected the type of Acacia mearnsii from a cultivated specimen in East Africa. (Hugh Clarke, pers. comm.; Wikipedia; Smithsonian Institution Archives)
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Medea of Colchis
The name Colchis had reference to the poisonous arts of the legendary Medea of Colchis, in reference to whom 'venena Colchica' was a common phrase of the Roman writers. Medea, the daughter of Aeetes, king of Colchis, and therefore the granddaughter of Helios and the niece of the sorceress Circe. In Alexandrine and Roman literature Medea became the archetypal sorceress. Without Medea, Jason would have failed to win the Golden Fleece; she gave him the ointment to protect him from being burnt by the bulls of Hephaestus and with the spells sent the dragon to sleep. A later legend related by Diodorus, informs us that in reality Medea was a princess of great humanity and much opposed to her father's policy of killing all foreigners who arrived in his country.
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Medusa
  caput-medusa
Medusa: one of the Gorgons, daughter of Phorcus; she captivated Neptune with her golden hair, an became by him the mother of Pegasus. Minerva, as a punishment, turned her hair into serpents, and gave her eyes an enchanted power of converting every thing they looked upon to stone. Perseus, provided with the shield of Pallas, slew her, and carried off her head, while from the blood that dropped from it, serpents sprung.
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Mercier
  Merciera
Marie Philippe Mercier (1781-1831), French botanist born on the island of Martinique, plant collector and traveller, later moved to Geneva and studied under de Candolle. After his death, his considerable herbarium of some 300,000 West Indian plants was purchased by the British naturalist Philip Barker Webb. He died before his work Choix de plantes exotiques rares ou novelles was completed and it was never published in its entirety. The genus Merciera in the Campanulaceae was published in 1830 by French-Swiss botanist Alphonse Louis Pierre Pyramus de Candolle. (CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names; PlantzAfrica; Acta Botanica Venezuelica)
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Merian
  Meriana
Maria Sibylla Merian (1647-1717), a German naturalist, botanical and entomological illustrator and painter of flowers. The following is quoted from a website of the Memorial Library at the University of Wisconsin, Madison: "Born in Frankfurt to an etcher and book publisher father who died when she was three, Maria Sibylla Merian first studied flower painting with her step-father, Jacob Marrel. She married in 1665 and began her own botanical and entomological work after she and her family moved to Nuremberg in 1670. To facilitate her studies, Merian raised and kept live specimens and was therefore able to show the insects at each stage of their development. Merian left her husband in 1685 and with her children joined a Labadist sect [a 17th century Protestant religious community] in Frankfurt. In 1699 she traveled with her daughter Dorothea to a Labadist mission in Surinam where she completed a series of paintings detailing the tropical flora and fauna. After a bout with yellow fever, she moved to Amsterdam in 1705 and published a series of engravings from her watercolors in Metamorphosis Insectorum Surinamensium. Merian died in poverty in 1717." She is commemorated with the taxon Watsonia meriana. (Hugh Clarke, pers. comm.; Wikipedia)
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Merxmüller
  Merxmuellera,   Merxmuelleri,   Merxmuelleriana
Hermann Merxmüller (Merxmueller) (1920-1988), German systematic botanist. He studied botany and then became a professor of systematic botany at the University of Munich, also Director of the Munich Botanical Gardens, the Botanische Staatssammiung, a notable herbarium at the Gardens, and the Institut für Systematische Botanik (Institute of Systematic Botany) at the University of Munich. He conducted many expeditions to Africa, and discovered more than 100 species of flowers new to science. He made five collecting trips to Namibia mostly in the company of Willi Giess who is noted for having started an official herbarium at Windhoek. He collected some 32,000 specimens in the UK, Austria, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Greece, Portugal, the Netherlands, Romania, Sweden, Iran, Egypt, Morocco, Botswana, Namibia, South Africa, Canada, the U.S., Venezuela, Brazil and Chile, of which about 6,000 were from southern Africa. He edited and published the Prodromus einer Flora von Sûdwestafrika (Prodromus of the Flora of South-West Africa) from 1966-72. (A prodromus is a preliminary publication or introductory work.) He was also the co-author with Gustav Hegi of Alpenflora; die wichtigeren Alpenpflanzen Bayerns, Österreichs und der Schweiz. The genus Merxmuellera in the Poaceae was published in 1970 by Hans Joachim Conert. He is commemorated with Erica merxmuelleri, Hermannia merxmuelleri, Carex merxmuelleri, Hibiscus merxmuelleri, Suaeda merxmuelleri, Barleria merxmuelleri, Corchorus merxmuelleri and Jamesbrittenia merxmuelleri. There are other taxa with the epithets 'merxmuelleri" and "merxmuellerianum" inGemmaria, Strumaria, Felicia, Ursinia, Eriocephalus, Salsola, Ornithogalum and Indigofera, but I can only assume that they honor the same individual. (CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names, JSTOR, Gunn & Codd)
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Meyer
  Meyeri,   Meyeriana,   Meyerianum,   Meyerianus
(1) Heinrich Meyer (fl. 1861-1886), German medical practitioner who practiced at the Cape, commemorated in the former Mesembryanthemum meyeri, now a synonym of Antimima papillata (Gunn & Codd); (2) the Rev. Louis Gottlieb Meyer (1867-1958), German clergyman, explorer, and plant and insect collector in South Africa, father of Helmut Ernst Meyer. Hugh Clarke provides the following: "He was sent by the Rhenish mission to Kommagass, Namaqualand, in 1894 and later served in Steinkopf which also included the Richtersveld. An agriculturalist by training, he had a keen interest plant and insect collecting. When Hermann Wilhelm Rudolf Marloth (1855-1931) paid visits to his area they collected together. Meyer sent Marloth many of the plants he discovered as well as to Adolar Gottlieb Julius (Hans) Herre (1895-1979), Curator of the University of Stellenbosch Gardens." He is commemorated with Cheiridopsis meyeri, Conophytum meyeri, Aloe meyeri, Euphorbia meyeri, the former taxa Herreanthus meyeri (now Conophytum herreanthus), Nelia meyeri (now N. pillansii), Ruschia meyeri (now Antimima papillata), Lithops meyeri, Meyerophytum meyeri and Stomatium meyeri (Etymological Dictionary of Succulent Plant Names); (3) Ernst Heinrich Friedrich Meyer (1791-1858), German professor and botanist whose herbarium of 24,000 specimens was largely destroyed during World War II bombing. He was professor of botany at the University of Konigsberg and Director of the Botanical Garden. His major work was Geschichte der Botanik (“History of Botany,” 1854–57). He is commemorated with Ceropegia meyeri, Asclepias meyeriana, the former taxon Crassula meyeri (now C. capitella), Hibiscus meyeri, Barleria meyeriana, Brachystelma meyerianum, and Eriochloa meyeriana. There are many other current and former taxa with these epithets and given the commonness of the name Meyer, I cannot confirm who they are named for. (Elsa Pooley; Trees and Shrubs of Mpumalanga and Kruger National Park; PlantzAfrica)
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Minthe
  Mentha
The nymph or naiad Minthe, daughter of Cocytus and mistress of Pluto, who fell in love with her. The story is that Persephone (Proserpine), Pluto's wife, attacked her in a jealous rage and transformed her into a plant. According to this story, Pluto couldn't reverse the spell but gave her a lovely fragrance. (W.P.U. Jackson) A nymph of the underworld, beloved of Pluto (Hades). She was illtreated by the jealous Proserpine (Persephone) and the god changed her into a plant, mint. This transformation took place on Mount Triphyle in Bithynia.
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Mohr
  Mohria
Daniel Matthias Heinrich Mohr (1780-1808), German botanist from Schleswig-Holstein who began his career as a student of Johann Christian Fabricius in Kiel and Heinrich Adolf Schrader in Göttingen. The son of a pastor, he became a professor of philosophy and later assistant professor of zoology and botany at Christian Albrecht University of Kieland, an authority on algae and bryophytes, and a plant collector and author. He worked in the Botanical Garden at Kiel, and was commemorated with the genus Mohria in the Anemiaceae which was published in 1806 by Swedish botanist Olof (Peter) Swartz. Although he died at the early age of 28, he authored the cryptogamic directory Observationes botanicae(1803) and co-authored Handbuch der Enleitung in das Studium der kryptogamischen Gewãchse and Naturhistorische Reise durch einen Theil Schwedens with the German entomologist Friedrich Weber. (CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names; Wikipedia)
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Montin
  Montinia
Lars Jonasson Montin (1723-1785), Swedish botanist and physician, botanical collector and pupil of Linnaeus. His specimens form the basis of the Swedish Academy of Sciences herbarium in Stockholm. Hugh Clarke provides the following information: "Aged 21, he studied mining engineering at the University of Lund for two years before moving to University of Uppsala, where he was inspired by Carl Linnaeus. He graduated as a medical doctor in 1751 and became the district medical officer for the County of Halland on the west coast of Sweden in 1756. Here, he met Pehr Osbeck (1723-1805) and together they made an inventory of flora of that area. While Osbeck went to China at Linneus's behest, Montin did botanical, zoological and ornithological research in Sweden. He discovered many new species and reported on the wild herbs in Halland. He was elected a member of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in 1771 and given the title of 'Assessor' in 1782." The genus Montinia in the Montiniaceae was published in 1776 by Swedish naturalist Carl Peter Thunberg. (CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names)
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Moraeus
  Moraea
Named after Dr Johan Moraeus and not Robert More, squire of Shrewsbury in the 18th century. The name Morea was originally intended by Philip Miller to commemorate the British amateur botanist and natural historian Robert More (1703-1780), traveller, friend of Linnaeus, and Fellow of the Royal Society of London, but the name was changed to Moraea apparently to honor either Sara Elizabeth (Elisabeth) Moraea (1716-1806), wife of Linnaeus, and possibly also Dr. Johan Moraeus, the town physician of Falun. It is not clear to me whether the name was changed by More or by Linnaeus. IPNI records the genus Morea as being published by More in 1758 in Fig. Pl. Gard. Dict. ii. 159, tt. 238, 239 [Figures of the most Beautiful, Useful, and Uncommon plants described in the Gardeners dictionary Vol. II], but then in the same year apparently in the same publication More published the name Moraea. In addition to this, there is an IPNI listing of Moraea published in 1762 with the author attribution Mill. ex. L. which implies that Linnaeus used the name and may have been responsible for the change. Hugh Clarke adds: "When Carl Linnaeus proposed to Sara in 1735 Dr. Moraeus agreed but insisted that before any marriage took place, Linnaeus should get qualified. Four years later, in 1739, when they married, Linnaeus had obtained a Doctorate in Medicine “cum laude” from Hardewijk University, and published Systema naturae, his major work, and Fundamenta botanica, and so gained a reputation." Several sources such as Paxton's Botanical Dictionary, Loudon's Encyclopaedia of Plants and William Nicholson's The British Encyclopedia attribute Moraea to an R. (Robert) Moore, botanist of Schrewsbury, and very likely the same Robert More referred to above. (CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names; Hugh Clarke)
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Morosini
  Maurocenia
Giovanni Francesco Morosini (1658-1739), Venetian Senator and a patron of botany. Hugh Clarke adds: "He was elected a Senator of the Great Council in 1690 and re-elected more than 30 times until 1738. He became Ambassador to the papal state in Rome from 1702-1706 under Pope Clement XI (1649 – 1721) and from 1709-1711 became Ambassador Extraordinary to the Holy Roman Emperor Joseph 1 (1678 –1711). He was elected reformer at the University of Padua on six occasions between 1719 - 1737 and made significant reforms to the University especially in regards to press law and the teachings of the University of Padua. He also developed a magnificent botanical garden in Padua which became famed throughout Europe." The genus Marocenia in the Celastraceae was published in 1754 by Scottish botanist Philip Miller. (CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names; Flora Domestica by Elizabeth Kent; Reiseskissen aus der Lombardei und Venetien by Adolph Senoner, 1860)
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Morpheus
Morpheus was one of the thousand children of Sleep (Hypnus). His name, which is derived from the Greek word for 'form', indicates his function: to take the shape of human beings and to show himself to people during their dreams. Like the majority of divinities associated with sleep and dreams Morpheus was winged. He had large swift wings which beat silently and could carry him in seconds to the ends of the earth.
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Muir
  susannae
(1) Susanna Amelia Koekemoer (née Kruger) (1939- ), mother of Dr. Marinda Koekemoer. She joined her daughter on many collecting trips, and was honored by her when Dr. Koekemoer published the name Amphiglossa susannae. (Miranda Koekemoer, pers. comm.); (2) Suzanne Lavranos (fl. 1962), former wife of succulent plant collector John Jacob Lavranos (1926- ), commemorated with Crassula susannae. (Etymological Dictionary of Succulent Plant Names); (3) Susanna Charlotte Louise Muir (née Steyn) (1882-1970), wife of Scottish physician and naturalist Dr. John Muir (1874-1947), commemorated with Protea susannae, Thesium susannae, and Euphorbia susannae. (Gunn & Codd;Etymological Dictionary of Succulent Plant Names)
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Mund
  Mundia,   Mundiana,   Mundii
Johannes Ludwig Leopold Mund/Mundt (1791-1831), a Prussian pharmacist, botanist, land surveyor and plant collector who was originally sent to the Cape by the Prussian government as a plant collector and arrived in 1816. He visited with Von Chamisso when he stopped at the Cape in the Rurik in 1818. Staying on the ship overnight, he was surprised on awakening to find that the Rurik had set sail, forcing him to seek a transfer to another ship going the opposite way. At some point he and his Prussian companion Louis Maire were recalled because the Prussian government claimed they had not heard from them in two years, but they ignored this recall and their services were terminated. Other collectors apparently were also not satisfied with his collecting rigor and yet his name was placed on a number of taxa by such botanists as Johann Friedrich Klotsch, Carl Daniel Freidrich Meisner, Christian Gottfried Daniel Nees von Esenbeck and Karl Wilhelm Ludwig Pappe, so he must have been considered significant within the botanical community. (Elsa Pooley, David Hollombe, Gunn & Codd)
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Muralt
  Muraltia
Johannes von Muralt (1645-1733), Swiss surgeon and botanist, anatomist, professor of physics and mathematics at the Zürich Collegium Carolinum, and son of successful merchant Johann Melchior von Muralt (1614-1686). He studied medicine under Johann Caspar Bauhin and helped to found the teaching of anatomy and medicine there. He was a prolific writer on surgery, anatomy, obstetrics, biology, pathology, philosphy, zoology, botany and general medicine, producing several significant medical books along the way. He was superstitious and believed that the Devil played a large part in the ills of mankind. He was a member of a prominent family most of whom where physicians beginning with Johannes Muralt (Muralto) who emigrated from Locarno to Zürich in 1555. He was elected to the Academia Naturae Curiosorum in 1685. He was a member of Academia Leopoldina. He authored Vade-mecum anatomicum sive clavis medicinae (1677), Anatomisches Collegium (1687), Hippocrates Helveticus oder der Eydgenössische Stadt-Land-und Hauss-Artzt (1692) and Systema physicae experimentalis in 4 vols. (1705–1714). The genus Muraltia in the Polygalaceae was published in 1790 by Belgian botanist and physician Noel Martin Joseph de Necker. (CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names; Johannes von Muralt edited by Urs Boschung, 1983; The Galileo Project; Encyclopedia.com)
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